Scientists Present Evidence on Expanding DNA Strands

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The human genome is packed with millions of gene switches that reside in bits of DNA that once were dismissed as “junk” but it turns out that so-called junk DNA plays critical roles in controlling how cells, organs and other tissues behave. Cambridge researchers have published a paper proving that four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structures — known as G-quadruplexes — also exist within the human genome. The question is, how many DNA strands are human beings capable of possessing? Some geneticists are claiming humans will one day have 12 strands.

Just a few years ago, modern medicine officially acknowledged the first case of a child with 3 DNA strands. A two-year-old boy, Alfie Clamp became the only person in the world to be diagnosed with an extra strand in his DNA. He was born blind and with severe disabilities, which led doctors to carry out various tests. They revealed his seventh chromosome had an extra strand of material which had never been documented anywhere in the world before. Doctors were baffled at his condition, which is so rare it does not have a name.

Dr. Berrenda Fox said “we are finding that there are other helixes that are being formed. In the double helix there are two strands of DNA coiled into a spiral.” Dr. Fox says there are major changes and mutations occuring in our DNA. We are evolving. “We will be developing twelve helixes. During this time, which seems to have started maybe 5 to 20 years ago, we have been mutating. This is the scientific explanation. It is a mutation of our species into something for which the end result is not yet known,” she stated.

The findings of the G-quadruplexes mark the culmination of over 10 years investigation by scientists to show these complex structures in vivo — in living human cells — working from the hypothetical, through computational modelling to synthetic lab experiments and finally the identification in human cancer cells using fluorescent biomarkers.

The research, published in Nature Chemistry and funded by Cancer Research UK, goes on to show clear links between concentrations of four-stranded quadruplexes and the process of DNA replication, which is pivotal to cell division and production.

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